Did You Know DUI: Dry Counties Have More DUI Charges Than Wet Counties

By March 15, 2016Thomas Law Firm


You probably remember learning about Prohibition in school. You probably also know that it is now remembered as an utter failure. The goals of Prohibition were to reduce crime, solve social problems, reduce the tax burden of prisons and to improve American health; it had pretty much the opposite effect on all counts.

Yet, the shadow of Prohibition still hangs over many American counties – they’re called dry counties, where alcohol is not allowed to be sold. While Colorado does not have any dry counties, there are a few in neighboring Kansas and stretching across the south.

Studies have shown that, like Prohibition, dry counties simply do not reduce crime, tax burdens or improve American health. In fact, according to studies, DUI rates are higher in dry counties than in wet counties or “mixed” counties (where alcohol can be sold, but is restricted in other ways).

Kentucky, Arkansas and the NCSA Agree: Dry Counties Lead to Higher DUI

According to a study in Kentucky, residents of dry counties are exposed to higher rates of impaired driving because in order to obtain alcohol, those people must drive longer distances. On their way back, they spend more time impaired on the road.

An Arkansas study corroborated these findings, noting that businesses serving alcohol often pop up right outside the borders of dry counties, minimizing the distance in which a driver seeking alcohol has to go through a wet county. Thus the driver spends nearly the entire drive after drinking in the dry country trying to get home, where they are then arrested for DUI.

Lastly, the National Center for Statistics and Analysis noted that DUI-related accidents are nearly four times as likely in dry counties.

Prohibition doesn’t work; not back in the 1920s and certainly not now.

The drunk driving defense attorneys at Thomas Law Firm can help you in all matters relating to charges of drunk or drugged driving.

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